Advice for Facilities Managers or Office Managers Planning an Office or Industrial Move

Like families, there comes a time when every business must move on.  While some office relocations are less complicated than others, the job of actually coordinating a corporate move can mean a lot of stress for the facilities manager or office manager selected to facilitate the task.   Moving an office from one location to another requires a lot planning, organization, and communication from every member of the office.  The manager at the company who is responsible for the move – the one who wants it to go as smoothly as possible – will be the one who is most willing to take advantage of every resource at their disposal to make the transition as seamless as possible.  For many businesses, a seamless transition is the one that is the most effective at reducing as much operational downtime as possible.

The first step to planning a corporate move is to organize each phase of the process on paper.  Making a list of priorities not only keeps the responsible manager on task, it helps to keep every member of the office on task.  Every employee, from the most junior to the most senior, needs to remain in the loop about the office relocation so that they can plan their duties and keep clients informed as necessary.  Once structured, the moving plan and any subsequent updated plans should be distributed freely so that no blame can be put on the person in charge for not keeping the office informed.

Before committing their employer to any type of agreement, the company representative in charge should interview as many prospective moving companies as possible, collecting bids for the job and verifying credentials along the way.  Because of the fact that thousands, if not millions, of dollars may be lost to a bad corporate moving experience, facilities managers – or whoever is in charge of the relocation – are urged to scrutinize credentials and references of relocation companies closely.  A moving company that is able to undercut the competition by skimping on insurance coverage or licensing fees is not a company that should be trusted with company assets.    

Like families, there comes a time when every business must move on.  While some office relocations are less complicated than others, the job of actually coordinating a corporate move can mean a lot of stress for the facilities manager or office manager selected to facilitate the task.   Moving an office from one location to another requires a lot planning, organization, and communication from every member of the office.  The manager at the company who is responsible for the move – the one who wants it to go as smoothly as possible – will be the one who is most willing to take advantage of every resource at their disposal to make the transition as seamless as possible.  For many businesses, a seamless transition is the one that is the most effective at reducing as much operational downtime as possible.

The first step to planning a corporate move is to organize each phase of the process on paper.  Making a list of priorities not only keeps the responsible manager on task, it helps to keep every member of the office on task.  Every employee, from the most junior to the most senior, needs to remain in the loop about the office relocation so that they can plan their duties and keep clients informed as necessary.  Once structured, the moving plan and any subsequent updated plans should be distributed freely so that no blame can be put on the person in charge for not keeping the office informed. 

Before committing their employer to any type of agreement, the company representative in charge should interview as many prospective moving companies as possible, collecting bids for the job and verifying credentials along the way.  Because of the fact that thousands, if not millions, of dollars may be lost to a bad corporate moving experience, facilities managers – or whoever is in charge of the relocation – are urged to scrutinize credentials and references of relocation companies closely.  A moving company that is able to undercut the competition by skimping on insurance coverage or licensing fees is not a company that should be trusted with company assets.